Knitting 101: Some More Fixes

As you can imagine, issues come up with purl stitches and stockinette as much as with knit stitches and garter. In fact, a lot of the same issues come up. I hesitate to call them mistakes, though. While that’s exactly what they are, I think “learning experiences” is more accurate, particularly because these so-called “mistakes” will become techniques in other forms of knitting.

What do I mean by that? Well, just take k2tog (knit two together), which we talked about a couple weeks ago. Technically, when we were knitting just plain knit stitches, that was a mistake. At the same time, though, that’s a very common design or decrease technique. You may use that as you decrease the crown of a hat or use it to create elegant designs in lace. If you knit two together during your plain knitting, you were able to practice a move you’ll likely use a lot later.

Same with some issues that come up with purling. So, let’s get started!

Purling Two Together

 

See the two bumps on the new stitch?

See the two bumps on the new stitch?

Just as you can knit two stitches together, so too can you purl two stitches together. If you catch this right away, all you have to do is slip the new stitch off of your right needle, pull the working yarn to release the two stitches, and then put them back on the left-hand needle. Make sure the right leg goes in front, just like before. If you don’t catch this right away, you may have to tink back. We’ll talk about tinking with purl stitches in just a little bit.

Twisted Stitches

This has plagued me forever. Twisted stitches in stockinette are caused when you move the yarn the wrong way as you purl. I can’t tell you how long I purled backwards; I honestly can’t. What’s worse is I had no clue! More often than not, when I knit stockinette, it was in the round. The only purls I had were ribbing or decorative, but I couldn’t really see that anything was going wrong. That is, until I made the Baby Bias Blanket, my first flat stockinette piece.

I’m sorry I couldn’t get a good photo of this. Here is what stockinette should look like:

Sorry! More hot pink.

Sorry! More hot pink.

If your stitches look like they’re starting to spiral, become ridged-looking,have little to no stretch, or one leg isn’t lying as flat as the other, the stitches may be twisting.

Twisted stitches decrease the stretchiness of the fabric. It was a long time before I noticed this and so it took a while for me to catch on. You have a couple of options here. You can tink or frog back to redo the stockinette, or you can declare it a design element. That’s right, just embrace the mistake!

That’s what I did with the Baby Bias Blanket. It didn’t click that something was wrong with the stockinette until I was nearly halfway done. At that point, I decided there was no turning back. I just continued. (I’m sure my knitting mum-in-law spotted it though!)

Dropped Stitches in Stockinette

Dropped stitches happen to me all of the time. I mean, all of the time! In fact, while working on my Bosc scarf the other day, my needle slid and three stitches dropped off. I don’t think I can name one project where this hasn’t happened. As I said when we talked about this with regular knitting, don’t panic. It’s no big deal.

There are a couple of ways to fix dropped stitches in stockinette: with a crochet hook or your needles. The next videos and instructions are going to be very similar. I just want to show you the movements. Note, the only difference between fixing the dropped purl stitch versus knit stitch is where the ladder sits.

Purl Stitches

Knitting Needle Method

1. With the right leg forward, set the dropped stitch onto the left-hand needle. Make sure the ladder is sitting in front of the stitch when you do this.

2. Purl the stitch as usual, but instead of using the working yarn, purl with the ladder. Repeat for however many rows the stitch dropped.

3. Set the stitch back on the left-hand needle with the right leg forward. Continue purling!

Crochet Hook Method

1. Slip the crochet hook into the stitch to keep it from going anywhere.

2. Put the ladder to the front of the work and hold your stitch to the back.

3. With the hook, grab the ladder and pull it through the stitch. Repeat for however many rows the stitch dropped.

4. Set the stitch back on the left-hand needle with the right leg forward. Continue purling!

Knit Stitches

Knitting Needle Method

1. With the right leg forward, set the dropped stitch onto the left-hand needle. Make sure the ladder is sitting behind the stitch when you do this.

2. Knit the stitch as usual, but instead of using the working yarn, knit the ladder. Repeat for however many rows the stitch dropped.

3. Set the stitch back on the left-hand needle with the right leg forward. Continue knitting!

Crochet Hook Method

1. Slip the crochet hook into the stitch to keep it from going anywhere.

2. Put the ladder to the back of the work and hold your stitch to the front.

3. With the hook, grab the ladder and pull it through the stitch. Repeat for however many rows the stitch dropped.

4. Set the stitch back on the left-hand needle with the right leg forward. Continue knitting!

 

I hope your sampler is coming along well! I’d love to see your progress. Post photos on Ravelry or Facebook, or email them to me. Next week, we’ll finish up the sampler piece by casting off and weaving in the ends. After that, it’s blocking time! That’s where the real magic happens.

Need help? Want to share?

There are a few ways to get a hold of me if you need help. You can email me at fortheknitofit(at)gmail(dot)com, visit the Facebook page, or stop by the Ravelry group! Feel free to share your progress with pictures at any or all of these places. I’d love to see how you’re doing.

Already an experienced knitter? Share your experience and advice in the comments below or on the Facebook or Ravelry pages. I’ve learned so much from you all this past year, and I’m sure other newbies would benefit greatly from your experience and wisdom.

About these ads

7 thoughts on “Knitting 101: Some More Fixes

  1. Pingback: Knitting 101: Tools of the Trade | For the Knit of It

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s